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America's "School-to-Prison Pipeline" Problem

GrumpyGuyGrumpyGuy Member
edited December 2016 in Learning


The United States school-to-prison link or school-to-prison pipeline is a metaphor used to describe the increasing patterns of contact students have with the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems as a result of the recent practices implemented by educational institutions, specifically zero tolerance policies and the use of police in schools.[1] The metaphor is currently a hot topic of debate in discussions surrounding educational disciplinary policies as media coverage of youth violence and mass incarceration has grown over the past decade or so.[1][2][3]

The current sociopolitical climate, relating to mass incarceration, existent in the United States serves as a critical component in increasing the contact the incarceration system has with the United States education system, as patterns of criminalization translate into the school context.[1] Specific practices implemented in United States schools over the past ten years to reduce violence in schools, including zero tolerance policies and an increase in School Resource Officers have created the environment for criminalization of youth in schools. This results from patterns of discipline in schools mirroring law enforcement models.

The disciplinary policies and practices that create an environment for the United States school-to-prison link to occur disproportionately affect Latino and Black students which is later reflected in the rates of incarceration. Between 1999 and 2007, the percentage of black students being suspended has increased by twelve percent, while the percentage of white students being suspended has declined since the implementation of zero tolerance policies.[4] Relating this statistic to patterns of overall incarceration in the U.S., from 1980 to 2008, the number of people incarcerated in America quadrupled from roughly 500,000 to 2.3 million people.[5] The graphic to the right shows the uniqueness of this practice in comparison to other countries across the globe, with the United States incarcerating a larger portion of its population than any other country in 2008. The United States holds 25% of the world’s prisoners, but only has 5% of the world’s population.[6] Of the total incarcerated population in the United States, 61% are Black or Latino.[5]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School-to-prison_pipeline


Some additional non-Wikipedia reading on the subject:

http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ870076.pdf





People in this world look at things mistakenly, and think that what they do not understand must be the void. This is not the true void. It is bewilderment.
- Miyamoto Musashi, The Book of Five Rings

Comments

  • GrumpyGuyGrumpyGuy Member
    edited December 2016
    Zero tolerance = zero thinking, zero flexibility and zero empathy.  Having such a system as the role model of children seems like an easy recipe for a population of sociopaths.

    It's no wonder that current university students are ultra-sensitive, easily offended and extraordinarily inflexible.  We taught them to be that way by transforming their learning environment into a setting where any and all bad behaviour results in instant punishment and/or removal of the offender.  Now they believe, as adults, that this instant justice should continue, and that people who wrong them should be removed from their lives no questions asked. 

    Young adults have absolutely no idea how to resolve conflicts on their own because our generations have taken that freedom away from them.  Who is to blame?  Everyone, sadly.

    Parents are to blame because they demand schools change to meet their demands.  If the schools don't change, they sue.

    Lawyers and politicians are to blame for allowing this kind of legal abuse to go on.

    Administrators and educators are to blame for giving up and creating knee-jerk "Zero Tolerance" policies to save their own asses.

    The only people not to blame are the kids, because their role models are absolute screw-ups.  Funny how most older people immediately blame the kids, though, since they can't stand up for themselves.  Much easier than blaming other older people, since doing so might reflect badly upon oneself.

    It's a messy situation, no doubt about it.
    People in this world look at things mistakenly, and think that what they do not understand must be the void. This is not the true void. It is bewilderment.
    - Miyamoto Musashi, The Book of Five Rings
  • Aboriginal prison rates. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are massively overrepresented in the criminal justice system of Australia. Aboriginal people represent only 3% of the total population, yet more than 28% of Australia's prison population are Aboriginal.Aug 11, 2016

    "We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves."

  • Matt_ADMIN_Matt_ADMIN_ Administrator
    In America, the prison systems are essentially run like corporations from what I've seen, especially the youth prison systems, so there's a lot of money to be made in keeping people in a constant state of punishment. If I'm not mistaken, there was a judge convicted in America not too long ago for taking bribes in order to keep jails full of "juvenile offenders".


    -------------------
    "...Say, 'GOD is sufficient for me.' In Him the trusters shall trust." (Quran 39:38)
  • In America, the prison systems are essentially run like corporations from what I've seen, especially the youth prison systems, so there's a lot of money to be made in keeping people in a constant state of punishment. If I'm not mistaken, there was a judge convicted in America not too long ago for taking bribes in order to keep jails full of "juvenile offenders".



    Did the conviction end up in punishment or just a reprimand, I wonder.

    "We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves."

  • The judge was sentenced to three weeks of hard drinking in Cancun Mexico.
    People in this world look at things mistakenly, and think that what they do not understand must be the void. This is not the true void. It is bewilderment.
    - Miyamoto Musashi, The Book of Five Rings
  • The judge was sentenced to three weeks of hard drinking in Cancun Mexico.
    LOL!

    "We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves."

  • Matt_ADMIN_Matt_ADMIN_ Administrator
    In America, the prison systems are essentially run like corporations from what I've seen, especially the youth prison systems, so there's a lot of money to be made in keeping people in a constant state of punishment. If I'm not mistaken, there was a judge convicted in America not too long ago for taking bribes in order to keep jails full of "juvenile offenders".



    Did the conviction end up in punishment or just a reprimand, I wonder.
    It's sadly known as the "Kids for Cash" scandal:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kids_for_cash_scandal

    -------------------
    "...Say, 'GOD is sufficient for me.' In Him the trusters shall trust." (Quran 39:38)
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