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AImotive aims to convert regular cars into driverless ones inexpensively

RosieRosie Member, Permitted to post new threads

AImotive aims to convert regular cars into driverless ones inexpensively

While other autonomous car projects rely on an expensive radar-like system called Lidar, AImotive is trying to do the same using regular cameras and AI

AImotive’s driverless technology relies on regular cameras combined with artificial intelligence. Photograph: Olivia Solon for the Guardian

Olivia Solon in Mountain View, California

Sunday 5 March 2017 23.00 AEDT Last modified on Sunday 5 March 2017 23.02 AEDT

The AImotive office is in a small converted house at the end of a quiet residential street in sunny Mountain View, spitting distance from Google’s headquarters. Outside is a branded Toyota Prius covered in cameras, one of three autonomous cars the Hungarian company is testing in the sleepy neighbourhood. It’s a popular testing ground: one of Google’s driverless cars, now operating under spin-out company Waymo, zips past the office each lunchtime.

While other autonomous car projects, including those from Waymo and Uber, rely on an expensive (but very useful) radar-like system called Lidar for depth perception and obstacle detection (as well as cameras for seeing the colour of traffic lights and signs), AImotive is trying to do the same using regular cameras combined with artificial intelligence. This means the company can convert a regular car into a driverless one for a fraction of the price – around $6,000 – as opposed to $70,000-$100,000.

“The whole traffic system is based on the visual system,” explained founder and CEO Laszlo Kishonti. “Drivers don’t have bat ears and sonars, you just look around and drive.”

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/mar/05/aimotive-driverless-cars-artificial-intelligence-cameras

"We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves."

Comments

  • Matt_ADMIN_Matt_ADMIN_ Administrator
    This will surely shake up the market if there's some sort of "kit" that can convert existing cars - probably a lot cheaper than buying a dedicated car
    -------------------
    "...Say, 'GOD is sufficient for me.' In Him the trusters shall trust." (Quran 39:38)
  • tazweisstazweiss Member, Permitted to post new threads
    I don't think I'm ready to trust my life, or the lives of my loved ones, to a calculator and some camera's.

    If the politicians treat people this poorly when they're armed to the teeth,

    just imagine what they'll be willing to do once they've disarmed everyone.

  • Matt_ADMIN_Matt_ADMIN_ Administrator
    Not even those fancy Japanese calculators and cameras? 
    -------------------
    "...Say, 'GOD is sufficient for me.' In Him the trusters shall trust." (Quran 39:38)
  • tazweisstazweiss Member, Permitted to post new threads
    Not even those fancy Japanese calculators and cameras? 

    Maybe at low speed in light traffic.  Though I do have to admit that it would probably be safer than riding with my brother.

    If the politicians treat people this poorly when they're armed to the teeth,

    just imagine what they'll be willing to do once they've disarmed everyone.

  • RosieRosie Member, Permitted to post new threads

    6 scenarios self-driving cars still can't handle

    • Aug. 25, 2016, 9:02 AM  Business Insider
    Tesla autopilotTesla

    When a Tesla Model S was involved in the first fatal crash while Autopilot was activated, Tesla wrote in a blog post that the Autopilot system did not notice "the white side of the tractor trailer against a brightly lit sky, so the brake was not applied."

    The fatal accident is still under investigation by government regulators, but that one sentence doesn't bode too well for Tesla. It shows that despite how far autonomous technology has come, there are still some situations that are better handled by human drivers.

    That's not to say human drivers are perfect — more than 37,000 people die in the US each year from car crashes, according to the Association for Safe International Road Travel. As many companies working on driverless cars have noted, having autonomous vehicles on the road could drastically reduce that number. 

    But for that to happen, driverless cars still need to improve in some key areas. 

    View As: One Page Slides


    1. Driverless cars struggle going over bridges.

    Raffi Krikorian, Uber's engineering director, recently told Bloomberg that its driverless cars struggle going over bridges. That's because Uber has meticulously mapped roads so that the driverless car can compare what it's seeing with what is supposed to be there, helping it avoid objects and pedestrians.

    Because bridges don't have many environmental cues like surrounding buildings, it's hard for the Uber car to figure out where it is. GPS helps the car position itself, but not to the accuracy Uber wants.

    2. Self-driving cars also struggle to "see" in inclement weather.

    read more:
    http://www.businessinsider.com/autonomous-car-limitations-2016-8?IR=T/#1-driverless-cars-struggle-going-over-bridges-1

    "We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves."

  • Matt_ADMIN_Matt_ADMIN_ Administrator
    I think the main issue right now is that a road is just an open, ruleless path, which necessitates all sorts of compensation on the part of the vehicle. If there were tracks in place (even painted ones that a camera could lock into and follow), and the system was based on tracks rather than simply flow, it might be easier to organize. 

    Sort of like a train system, but vastly more complex.
    -------------------
    "...Say, 'GOD is sufficient for me.' In Him the trusters shall trust." (Quran 39:38)
  • RosieRosie Member, Permitted to post new threads
    We might end up with every household having a set of 6 or 7 laser tracks only their driverless vehicle can travel. Work, chosen medical centre, school, shopping centre, dentist and favourite restaurant/ fast food outlet. Tip - hang on to that old bicycle!

    "We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves."

  • Lynsey_ADMIN_Lynsey_ADMIN_ Administrator
    tazweiss said:
    I don't think I'm ready to trust my life, or the lives of my loved ones, to a calculator and some camera's.
    Agreed, I still think it is a bad idea
    "Before you embark on a Journey of Revenge, Dig Two Graves" Confucius (504 bc)
    “The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who maintain their neutrality in times of moral crisis.”
    "If angry, count to ten. This will give you time to find a weapon." - Will Spencer
  • Matt_ADMIN_Matt_ADMIN_ Administrator
    Cycling is good for the constitution, comrade!

    Well, public transportation operates entirely on "tracks" so to speak, and it seems to be mostly alright. I think if public transportation systems could be improved, we might not even need to worry so much about "driverless" cars.

    The main reason there's so much interest in this is probably the same reason robots become an intriguing prospect anywhere: it eliminates human labour and saves the robots' owners a lot of money. Driverless cars also increase the market for people to buy vehicles, since not everyone knows / wants to know how to drive.

    I don't think the people making driverless cars care so much about people's freedom of movement.
    -------------------
    "...Say, 'GOD is sufficient for me.' In Him the trusters shall trust." (Quran 39:38)
  • tazweisstazweiss Member, Permitted to post new threads
    I think the main issue right now is that a road is just an open, ruleless path, which necessitates all sorts of compensation on the part of the vehicle. If there were tracks in place (even painted ones that a camera could lock into and follow), and the system was based on tracks rather than simply flow, it might be easier to organize. 

    Sort of like a train system, but vastly more complex.

    I read, years ago, about a proposal to imbed strong, permanent magnets every 3 feet in the center of driving lanes.  That would give driverless cars a track to follow.  The magnets would be strong enough that they could be followed on snow covered roads.  This was before the advent of GPS, so the cars would actually count the magnets to determine the distances for driving.

    If the politicians treat people this poorly when they're armed to the teeth,

    just imagine what they'll be willing to do once they've disarmed everyone.

  • Matt_ADMIN_Matt_ADMIN_ Administrator
    tazweiss said:
    I think the main issue right now is that a road is just an open, ruleless path, which necessitates all sorts of compensation on the part of the vehicle. If there were tracks in place (even painted ones that a camera could lock into and follow), and the system was based on tracks rather than simply flow, it might be easier to organize. 

    Sort of like a train system, but vastly more complex.

    I read, years ago, about a proposal to imbed strong, permanent magnets every 3 feet in the center of driving lanes.  That would give driverless cars a track to follow.  The magnets would be strong enough that they could be followed on snow covered roads.  This was before the advent of GPS, so the cars would actually count the magnets to determine the distances for driving.
    That's actually a pretty good idea, because strong magnets don't require a constant supply of electricity, and wouldn't go down in the event of a systemic mishap - plus everyone's cell phones would be wiped clean, so they couldn't use them anymore. 

    Added safety bonus!
    -------------------
    "...Say, 'GOD is sufficient for me.' In Him the trusters shall trust." (Quran 39:38)
  • RosieRosie Member, Permitted to post new threads
    tazweiss said:
    I think the main issue right now is that a road is just an open, ruleless path, which necessitates all sorts of compensation on the part of the vehicle. If there were tracks in place (even painted ones that a camera could lock into and follow), and the system was based on tracks rather than simply flow, it might be easier to organize. 

    Sort of like a train system, but vastly more complex.

    I read, years ago, about a proposal to imbed strong, permanent magnets every 3 feet in the center of driving lanes.  That would give driverless cars a track to follow.  The magnets would be strong enough that they could be followed on snow covered roads.  This was before the advent of GPS, so the cars would actually count the magnets to determine the distances for driving.
    That's actually a pretty good idea, because strong magnets don't require a constant supply of electricity, and wouldn't go down in the event of a systemic mishap - plus everyone's cell phones would be wiped clean, so they couldn't use them anymore. 

    Added safety bonus!
    China's maglev train which I've been on runs on magnets.  However for anyone with metal implants,pacemakers or artificial teeth on metal plate running cars on magnets could be risky.
    * Sswwissh Kazoong!*

    "We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves."

  • tazweisstazweiss Member, Permitted to post new threads
    I don't think the magnets would be strong enough to affect such things as pacemakers, unless perhaps a person laid on the road directly over one.  They would probably be just strong enough for the under car sensors to detect.

    If the politicians treat people this poorly when they're armed to the teeth,

    just imagine what they'll be willing to do once they've disarmed everyone.

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